FOOD MILES

BEING LOCAL: DISTANCE MATTERS

 

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Concepts like “Food Miles” and “Carbon Foot Prints” are designed to make people think about what they eat and where it comes from.  Becoming more connected with a local food system strenghtens a community.  It keeps money in a local economy and connects local food producers and consumers.  Food choices have  an impact not only on a community.  “Food Miles” offer consumers a straightforward way to see how their buying choices can contribute to climate change.

 Food Miles

Lagier Ranches
Escalon, CA
9 December 2010

FOOD MILES

The distance food travels from the field to your table.

OTHER RELATED TERMS

THE 100 MILE DIET
A common unit of measure used to denote the maximum distance food can travel and still remain local to the consumer.
 
LOCAL FOODSHED
a geographic area where food is grown and consumed; it also accounts for population density, land quality, and available distribution routes.
 
RESILIENCE
The ability to keep going even when things around you are going wrong.
 
LOCAL
The principle that a given entity belongs or relates to a particular area.
 
FOOD LITERACY
Consumers that learn about food production and agricultural practices can determine which systems to support and which to shun. 
 
EAT-IN
The gathering of communities to share a home cooked meal.
 
LOW CARBON DIET
The way food is grown, transported and prepared affects the amount of pollution produced.  This includes airborne pollutants as well as green house gases released into waterways and soil systems.  A low carbon diet involves consuming llocally grown and harvested food.
 

ADDITIONAL TEXT TAKEN FROM THE PHOTOGRAPH

JOHN LAGIER GROWS CITRUS, CHERRIES, BLACKBERRIES AND MORE FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA FOODSHED. I ask John why people should be so concerned with eating locally and he says, “Buying directly from the producer reduces the energy costs which result from transporting food great distance. Plus, it’s great to have a relationship with the people who grow your food while also contributing to the sustained health of your local economy.” (He also says the food has a fresher taste.)

ABOUT JOHN LAGIER

John Lagier is a 4th generation farmer in San Joaquin County, California. His great grand father dry farmed wheat and barley and raised mules, his grandfather continued on the same land with a cattle ranch which his father then diversified into almond orchards, vineyards and row crops. Each generation added more diversity to the farm. John began farming grapes and almonds in 1979. He initiated his own generational footprint on the land in 1992 when he started to transition the farm to organic and we became Lagier Ranches, Inc. By 1996 we were 100% organic. In 2000, our quest for sustainability and diversification led us to the creation of a commercial kitchen on the farm where all the sweet fruits of our labors could be packaged and sold directly to the consumer. The results are farm crafted almond snacks, almond butters, fruit spreads and hand-made pies made with fruit fillings that taste like the fruit was just picked. We call it “from the soil to the plate”.

ADDITIONAL WEBSITES OF INTEREST

Lagier Ranches

CUESA

Locavores

CAFF

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle

Planet Green- What’s the Footprint of your food?

 

 

 

 

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Farm Fairies

As speculators keep driving the price of available farmland higher, new farmers like Kasey and Jeff from Lonesome Whistle Farm in Eugene, Oregon are priced out of the market. Socially responsible "slow money" investors help small farmers buy farmland ... keeping food local and affordable.